Turners Crossing - Origins and Early Settlement


 

Turners Crossing – Origins and Early Settlement

 

The name of this outstanding vineyard originates from a popular ford (Two Chain Road) used by local farmers to cross the Loddon River in the mid to late 1800s on their way to Inglewood, from where they could access a bank and the main train line to Bendigo and beyond……….

 

Rumour has it that Thomas Turner, the first registered owner of the land title where the vineyard sits today, operated a punt used to ferry the locals across the Loddon River near his property. He purportedly was also the local hotel keeper and farmed the estate, although it wasn't fruit of the vine he was producing back then…

 

Allotments in the area were taken up by Selectors in the mid 1800s, not long after the arrival of prospectors and gold-diggers arriving on the Bendigo and Mt.Alexander goldfields at that time.  The nearby township of Serpentine was established in 1863 and eventually became the seat of the Shire of East Loddon.

 

In 1903, Serpentine was described in the Australian Handbook as follows…

 

 

Today Serpentine is a producer of grain, cattle and one exceptional fruit-bearing vineyard. The Loddon in this area remains a popular place for anglers.

 

 

Late Autumn Recipe

 

Lamb Korma Meatballs (Dinner with Turners Crossing Shiraz Viognier)

 

INGREDIENTS

Meatballs:

  • 500 gm. Lamb mince
  • 2 Tbsp. Lamb Korma paste
  • 1 Tbsp. ginger
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh coriander

Korma Sauce:

  • 1 packet Korma simmer sauce
  • 2 Tbsp. Lamb Korma Paste
  • Small tin coconut cream
  • 1 packet spinach
  • Crushed nuts (eg. Peanuts or almonds)
  • Greek Yoghurt to serve

METHOD

Meatballs

Add all ingredients to mince and combine well.  Make mixture into meatballs.  Brown in hot frying pan with oil in batches and set aside.

Korma Sauce

Place Korma simmer sauce, lamb Korma paste and coconut cream in large frying pan or pot.

Return meatballs to pan and let simmer for 20 minutes until cooked through.  Add spinach at the end.

Serve and sprinkle with nuts and a dollop of yoghurt.

 

 

 

What’s happening in the Vineyard?....

 

Well, here’s evidence that there’s something special in the soils at Serpentine!...  These little pebbles of limestone are like vineyard gold nuggets. Their presence scattered through the river loam profile is what keeps the pH neutral and contributes to the high quality character of the soils that sustain and support vine health and vigour.  It’s no secret that vineyards established on soils with a limestone influence are highly regarded for the ‘edge’ they provide in fruit production that is full-bodied, expressive and exceptional in flavour.

 

So while the vines approach dormancy for winter, the foliage senesces and turns golden, the limestone pebbles continue to exert their unique attributes to ensure next year’s crop is even better.

 

Meanwhile, in the winery, we are well into secondary fermentation as the freshly pressed fruit progresses through its next stage of development.

 

Check out the primary ferment of the Turners Crossing Viognier gurgling away in François Frere oak barrels a few weeks ago…. Exciting flavours heading your way!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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