The Fruit - Vines & Varieties


The Turners Crossing vineyard consists of four grape varieties used to make the range of wines bearing the well-recognised label of this Central Victorian product.

 

The varieties have been carefully selected to reflect compatibility with the climate and soils of the vineyard site.  The vigour of the vines and fruit productivity is testament to that suitability. 

 

Cabernet Sauvignon

One of the world’s most widely recognised and grown red wine grape varieties, Cabernet Sauvignon produces wine that is typically medium-to full-bodied with high tannins and noticeable acidity, which in turn contributes to the ageing potential of the wine.  In more moderate to warm climates such as that found at Serpentine, the Cabernet Sauvignon exhibits blackcurrant notes with a hint of black cherry and black olives.

 

The Turners Crossing Cabernet Sauvignon vines (Clone SA125) were planted in 1999 in east-west rows ensuring minimal exposure of fruit to the adverse effects of sun and heat stress.  There are 40 acres with 30,000 Cabernet Sauvignon vines on the property, all of which are spur pruned.

 

 

Shiraz

Often described as the “Classic Australian Red Wine”, Shiraz was one of the original varieties brought into Australia and is now firmly established as an iconic grape variety grown in virtually every wine region across the country.

 

It is a relatively adaptable grape variety and can be grown in moderate to cool regions as well as warmer areas, such as the conditions found at Serpentine.  Shiraz creates medium to full-bodied wines with varying flavour profiles, depending on region, climate and winemaking techniques.

 

The Turners Crossing Shiraz is noted for its intense fruit characters and earthy savoury elements, which typify the wines of this region.  The fruit is rich, ripe and dark in colour with pronounced aromatics and fullness of flavour.

 

The Shiraz vines at Turners Crossing vineyard occupy 60 acres, with the most select fruit in the exceptional vintages being allocated for use in making ‘The Crossing’.

Viognier

The clear, pale yellow colour of Viognier as a single-varietal white wine is a key feature of this lesser known grape variety.  It has had a resurgence in Australian wine-making where its crisp acid finish is valued for blending with other varieties, most notably Shiraz in the case of Turners Crossing’s range of wines.

 

The aromatics associated with apricot, peach and orange blossom are notable characteristics of Viognier, which is considered somewhat between a chardonnay and Riesling in terms of style.

 

There are only 2 acres of Viognier vines at Turners Crossing vineyard, the bulk of fruit being used for the Shiraz Viognier in each vintage, however the single varietal has been produced since 2009 with favourable reviews awarded for this unique, but alluring wine variety.

 

Picolit

Originating in northeastern Italy, Picolit is a prized dessert wine made from a very rare grape variety with few examples of production in Australia.

 

Turners Crossing vineyard carries 1 acre of the grape variety, which is traditionally difficult to grow and has low annual yields.  The fruit, however presents a balance of acidity and sugar that lends itself well to dessert wine production.

 

While traditional methods of wine-making often rely on late harvest for extra sweetness in Picolit, Turners Crossing produces a style that is medium sweet with soft floral aromas that allows it to be consumed as an aperitif or as a more subtle dessert wine after a meal.

 

 

 

 

 

Late-Winter Recipe

 

Moroccan Lamb Tagine with dried fruits and

Turners Crossing Cabernet Sauvignon

 

INGREDIENTS

  • 1.6kg boneless shoulder of lamb, cut into 100g pieces
  • 50ml prepared saffron
  • 400g onions, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 250ml vegetable oil
  • 50g butter
  • 150ml water
  • 120g flaked almonds, toasted to garnish

For the spice mixture:

  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • ½ tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp salt
  • ½ tsp ground white pepper

For the dried fruits:

  • 150g dried apricots
  • 150g prunes
  • 150g dried figs
  • 4 cinnamon sticks

METHOD

Put the pieces of lamb in a large tagine dish.  Mix together the ingredients for the spice mixture.  Scatter on the spice mixture and roll the pieces of meat in the mixture.  Add the prepared saffron.  Put over a medium heat and add the onions, garlic, oil, butter and 100ml of the water.  Cover and leave to cook for 1 hour.

After 30 minutes, mix the dried fruits and the cinnamon sticks in a bowl, cover with a ladleful of the meat sauce and leave to swell for 30 minutes.

Add the fruit mixture with the cinnamon sticks and the juice to the meat tagine, cover and leave to cook for 10 more minutes.

Before serving, remove the cinnamon sticks, arrange the meat in the centre of the tagine and surround it with the dried fruits, alternating the three colours and sprinkle with the flaked almonds.

Serve with couscous and a glass of the finest Turners Crossing Cabernet Sauvignon!

 

What’s happening in the Vineyard? ...

 

The gradual appearance of an indication of warmer weather coupled with increasing day-length has significant impact on plant physiology.  While the now completed pruning leaves vines bare and reduced in size, already the vegetative buds for the new season’s growth are beginning to swell.  This is the time to apply a sulphur spray to protect the new foliage from rust mite and to create some residual effect that serves to control the development of powdery mildew as humidity increases after foliage appears.


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